State Data Resource Library: Critical data on poverty and nutrition, housing, utilities, and other basic needs

This is a centralized repository of national, state, and local information pertaining to poverty and other forms of hardship in the United States. Here you’ll find information from multiple surveys on poverty and on difficulties paying for food, housing, and utility costs. The Coalition on Human Needs has formatted much of the data available from sources such as the U.S. Census Bureau to make the information as accessible for human needs advocates as possible. Where available we have also included breakdowns of the data by select demographics. We hope the information will be useful in your own work, and urge you to cite the data in your social media posts and communications with your elected officials.

Among the sources you can find here:

  • The U.S. Census Bureau:

    • American Community Survey (ACS)

    • Current Population Survey (CPS)

    • Household Pulse Survey

  • Center for American Progress

Below, find an overview of the tables we have available. Where possible we have embedded the most recent version of the data on this page directly. Older data are linked here as well.

Table of Contents

Comparisons Over Time

Change in those reporting sometimes or often not having enough to eat: August 4-30, 2021 vs July 27- Sept 26, 2022

This table compares the average of respondents reporting sometimes or often not having enough to eat in the previous week between two periods: August 4 – 30, 2021 (when most families with children were receiving the monthly Child Tax Credit), and July 27 – September 26, 2022 (after the CTC was discontinued and prices were rising). To find information for your state or metropolitan area, scroll down through the list. States are ordered first, followed by metropolitan areas.

Note: The numbers 35, 36, 48, and 49 in the table correspond to the following Census Household Pulse releases:

Download a copy of this table here.

Household Pulse: Recent information on difficulty purchasing food, affording rent, and paying for utilities

Below, find select tables from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Household Pulse Survey Week 51, spanning November 2 – 14, 2022. These tables have been modified by the Coalition on Human Needs to find percentages among respondents reporting need (leaving out non-respondents, as the Census Bureau recommends). To see the original tables, follow this link here. We have also included comparisons over time in those reporting not having had enough to eat, and will soon be updating this page with other comparisons over time.

A note of caution:  some sample sizes, especially within states or metro areas, are too small to be reliable. If you see extreme shifts in the food comparisons for a small subset of the population, we would encourage you not to use those comparisons.

You can copy and paste from the tables below, but if you’d like to manipulate the data directly, you’ll need to download a copy of the table. We’ve provided a direct download link to an Excel version of each of these tables. To calculate percentages for other rows, add together the full range of responses (leaving out the numbers in the “Total” column and the “Did not report” column).  For the Food 1 table, add together the cells for “sometimes” or “often” not having enough food.  Divide that sum by the number in the “Total Reporting” cell and convert to a percentage.

If you’re having trouble seeing the tables we have provided, you may download the spreadsheets directly using the provided hyperlinks. If you are still having issues, or if you have any other questions, contact Nicolai Haddal: nhaddal@chn.org.

Note: Upon loading, it may be necessary to use the scrollbars on the right and bottom of the box to adjust your view.

 

Food Table 1, Week 51: Food Sufficiency for Households, in the Last 7 Days, by Select Characteristics

To find data for your state or metropolitan area in the table below, go to the bottom of the table to the row showing state abbreviations. Click the right arrow in the bottom left until you get to the state or metropolitan area you’d like to access; click on the state/metro area to pull up that table.  For all tables, you can scroll down to see all the rows and/or use your keyboard directional arrows to see all the columns.

Download a copy of this table here.

 

Household Spending Table 1. Difficulty Paying Usual Household Expenses in the Last 7 Days, by Select Characteristics

To find data for your state or metropolitan area in the table below, go to the bottom of the table to the row showing state abbreviations. Click the right arrow in the bottom left until you get to the state or metropolitan area you’d like to access; click on the state/metro area to pull up that table.  For all tables, you can scroll down to see all the rows and/or use your keyboard directional arrows to see all the columns.

Download a copy of this table here.

 

Housing Table 1b. Last Month’s Payment Status for Renter-Occupied Housing Units, by Select Characteristics

To find data for your state or metropolitan area in the table below, go to the bottom of the table to the row showing state abbreviations. Click the right arrow in the bottom left until you get to the state or metropolitan area you’d like to access; click on the state/metro area to pull up that table.  For all tables, you can scroll down to see all the rows and/or use your keyboard directional arrows to see all the columns.

Download a copy of this table here.


 

Housing Table 4. Household Energy Use and Spending in the last 12 Months, by Select Characteristics

To find data for your state or metropolitan area in the table below, go to the bottom of the table to the row showing state abbreviations. Click the right arrow in the bottom left until you get to the state or metropolitan area you’d like to access; click on the state/metro area to pull up that table.  For all tables, you can scroll down to see all the rows and/or use your keyboard directional arrows to see all the columns.

Download a copy of this table here.

Education Table 2.Paying for Childcare and Cost in the Last 7 Days, by Select Characteristics

To find data for your state or metropolitan area in the table below, go to the bottom of the table to the row showing state abbreviations. Click the right arrow in the bottom left until you get to the state or metropolitan area you’d like to access; click on the state/metro area to pull up that table.  For all tables, you can scroll down to see all the rows and/or use your keyboard directional arrows to see all the columns.

Download a copy of this table here.

 

Older Household Pulse Survey Releases

American Community Survey: Percentage of Households with Income Under $50,000 Paying Half or More of Their Income on Rent

The following table shows the percentage of households with incomes below $50,000 paying half or more of their income on rent. The data is available for all fifty states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. These statistics are taken from the 2021 American Community Survey 1 year data, Table B25074.

In the table below, scroll down until you find your state. To view an original copy of this table that you can modify on your own, use the link here.

Webinar: CHN’s Guide to Using Census and Other Data to Track Poverty, Hardship and the Impact of Aid

Need a primer on the types of poverty data the Census Bureau releases annually in the American Community Survey and Current Population Survey? See a captioned recording of our most recent annual poverty data webinar here, and follow along using the slides here. Slides 50 and onward show you how to access the data online.

Center for American Progress: Poverty Data Map Tool

The Center for American Progress has created an interactive map that you can use to explore more than a dozen topics that measure the health of the economy at the state and national levels. Topics include:

  • Official poverty rate

  • Child poverty rate

  • High school graduation rate

  • Unemployment rate

  • Gender wage gap

  • Children living apart from parents

  • Teen birth rate

See the map at this link here.

ZERO TO THREE: State of Babies Yearbook 2022

Learn how your state measures up on indicators related to good health, strong families, and positive early learning experiences.

Household Pulse
rent
utility bills